Doris Duke’s Shangri La: Architecture, Landscape, and Islamic Art

Benice
  • Exhib_slideshow_exhibition_shangri-la_tile-gate

    Mosaic tile panel in the form of a gateway, Iran, probably 19th century. Stonepaste: monochrome-glazed, assembled as mosaic (48.454). On dining room lanai at Shangri La. © Tim Street-Porter 2011. Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Honolulu, Hawai‘i.

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  • Exhib_slideshow_exhibition_shangri-la_jewelry

    Necklace (57.54). India, late 19th or early 20th century. Enameled gold, cabochon rubies, diamonds, silk cord. ©2011, Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Photo by David Franzen. • Necklace pendant (57.206). Iran or Central Asia, 16th or 17th century. G

  • Exhib_slideshow_exhibition_shangri-la_sikander

    'Unseen 1,' Shahzia Sikander, HD-digital projection, 2011. Photo credit: David Adams.

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February 12, 2015 - June 07, 2015
Honolulu Museum of Art


Exhibition Overview

This showcase of objects of Islamic art from the spectacular Honolulu home of philanthropist and art collector Doris Duke (1912-1993) also includes new works by eight contemporary artists of Islamic background, all of whom have participated in Shangri La’s artist in residency program.

The works from Duke’s personal collection are being shown outside of Shangri La for the first time, in an exhibition that was organized on the centenary of her birth. After travelling nationally for two years, the show ends its journey in the objects’ “home”—Honolulu. Large-scale, newly commissioned photographs by Tim Street-Porter establish the context of the legendary five-acre property of Shangri La.

Open to the public under the auspices of the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art (DDFIA), Shangri La today maintains a collection of some 2,500 objects. With the estate able to accommodate approximately 20,000 visitors a year, the exhibition Doris Duke’s Shangri La is an extraordinary opportunity for thousands more to experience what guest curators Donald Albrecht and Tom Mellins call the “inventive synthesis” of architecture, landscape, and Islamic art that Duke achieved. In addition, the exhibition is a must-see even for those who have visited the Diamond Head property—most of the works in the show are not on view at Shangri La.

The contemporary works in the exhibition are by Ayad Alkadhi, Zakariya Amataya, Afruz Amighi, Shezad Dawood, Emre Hüner, Walid Raad, Shahzia Sikander, and Mohamed Zakariya.

Presented by

   Hospitality sponsor: Halekulani