Albatross

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    Albatross

Film:

Albatross

Showtimes:

Saturday Jun 30 04:00 PM

Location:

Doris Duke Theatre


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About the Film:

This event is no longer accepting RSVPs. WALK-IN SEATS will be available on a first come, first served basis.

 Directed by Chris Jordan. 2017. USA. 97 min.

Presented in collaboration with the Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation. 

Albatross is a stunning visual journey exploring the impacts of global plastic pollution through the eyes of the albatross on the remote Midway Atoll in the Hawaiian archipelago within Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. Filmmaker Chris Jordan—whose photographs of decomposing albatross bodies revealing kaleidoscopic compositions of ingested, deadly plastic were included in the museum's 2016 exhibition Plastic Fantastic?—records cycles of birth, life, and death of these magnificent seabirds, illustrating the consequences of our reliance on single-use plastics.  

Doors open at 3:30pm. Not suitable for children under 12.

Admission: Free with RSVP.

Special guests: Join us for a post-screening discussion with Chris Jordan, director of Albatross, and Lindsay Young, biologist and executive director of Pacific Rim Conservation. 

Chris Jordan's large-scale photographs capture the footprint of unchecked consumerism and waste, from the towering junkyards of Middle America to the skeletal remains of coastal birds whose stomachs reveal a diet of brightly colored plastic trash. While criticizing unsustainable consumption habits, his images often acknowledge the accidental beauty of their subjects, such as the crisp geometries of discarded cell phones and circuit boards lying in vast landfills. A former cooperate lawyer, Jordan also creates mosaic-style photos of instantly recognizable images—such as Seurat's famous painting A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, fashioned from 106,000 soda cans—that visualize the inconceivable statistics surrounding global consumption. His work has been showed internationally and is in the permanent collections of the Getty Museum, LACMA, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

Lindsay Young earned a bachelor of science from the University of British Columbia and a master of science from the University of Hawai'i. In 2009, she completed her PhD at the University of Hawai'i where her dissertation research focused on the population genetics, at sea foraging ecology, and conservation needs of Laysan Albatrosses. Lindsay has worked on numerous conservation projects in Hawai'i and the Pacific region over the last twelve years—serving as project coordinator for the Kaena Point Ecosystem Restoration Project which installed the first predator proof fence in the US at Kaʻena Point on O'ahu. She is currently focused on conducting translocation of Hawaiian Petrels and Newell’s Shearwaters at Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge into Kaua'i’s first predator-proof fence. Lindsay has authored several dozen scientific papers, served as the treasurer for the Pacific Seabird Group, the chair of the North Pacific Albatross Working Group, the former North Pacific correspondent for ACAP (Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels), and as a reviewer for multiple refereed journals. Lindsay was a 2011 recipient of the US Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Recovery Champion Award for her work on the Nihoa Millerbird Translocation, and in 2016 she received a special achievement award from the Pacific Seabird Group for her work with Hawaiian seabirds. She currently serves as an affiliate graduate faculty member at the University of Hawai'i Natural Resources and Environmental Management Department and as secretary of The Wildlife Society Hawai'i Chapter.

The Honolulu Museum of Art is proud to participate in Science on Screen®, an initiative to offer creative pairings of current, classic, cult, and documentary films with introductions by notable figures from the world of science, technology, and medicine. This is an initiative of the Coolidge Corner Theatre, with major support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. 

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